Notre Dame Cathedral Rose Window
Notre Dame Cathedral Rose Window

SOLD

Notre Dame Cathedral Rose Window
Framed: 74x74cm
Acrylic Gouache on Paper

Notre-Dame Cathedral, Paris, boasts three magnificent rose windows. Depicted here is the North Window. It was built circa 1250-1260 while Jean de Chelles was architect. Most of the original 13th Centry glasswork is still intact, filtering light into a rainbow of blues, reds, greens, browns and yellows. The wide spectrum of colours achieved in Medieval France's stained glass windows was produced by varying both the proportion of metal added to molten glass and the temperature to which the mixture was heated. Impurities in the metals, bubbles in the cooled glass and variations in the thickness of the cut panes would ultimately contribute to the jewel-like quality of finished windows. Coloured glass was cut to size by heating or with a diamond. Details were painted on with a mix of cullet (scrap glass), copper and Greek sapphire dissolved in wine or urine. This 'glass painting' was baked again, stimulating further chemical reactions that yielded visually interesting results. In the centre oculus of the north rose window is the image of Mary enthroned holding the Christ Child. Surrounding them are images of kings and prophets of the Old Testament.


(Thanks to repository.library.georgetown.edu for this information).

Take a closer look at this painting...

Notre Dame Cathedral Rose Window

SOLD

Notre Dame Cathedral Rose Window
Framed: 74x74cm
Acrylic Gouache on Paper

Notre-Dame Cathedral, Paris, boasts three magnificent rose windows. Depicted here is the North Window. It was built circa 1250-1260 while Jean de Chelles was architect. Most of the original 13th Centry glasswork is still intact, filtering light into a rainbow of blues, reds, greens, browns and yellows. The wide spectrum of colours achieved in Medieval France's stained glass windows was produced by varying both the proportion of metal added to molten glass and the temperature to which the mixture was heated. Impurities in the metals, bubbles in the cooled glass and variations in the thickness of the cut panes would ultimately contribute to the jewel-like quality of finished windows. Coloured glass was cut to size by heating or with a diamond. Details were painted on with a mix of cullet (scrap glass), copper and Greek sapphire dissolved in wine or urine. This 'glass painting' was baked again, stimulating further chemical reactions that yielded visually interesting results. In the centre oculus of the north rose window is the image of Mary enthroned holding the Christ Child. Surrounding them are images of kings and prophets of the Old Testament.


(Thanks to repository.library.georgetown.edu for this information).

Take a closer look at this painting...