Canterbury Cathedral Ceiling
Canterbury Cathedral Ceiling

Canterbury Cathedral Ceiling
Pen and Watercolour on Paper
Framed: 53 x 53cm

Frame
Matt black contemporary wooden frame with acrylic glazing.
Acid-free warm white double mount and backing board


The tower of Canterbury Cathedral is prominent for miles around the city, and stands 250 feet high to the top of its pinnacles. The fan vaulting seen from below is one of the most striking views in the cathedral - note the letters P (Prior), T (Thomas) and G (Goldstone) which surround the central blue shield with a white cross (arms of Christ Church Priory) this central shield and cross can be removed as a trap door - it is over 5 feet in diameter. Beside this trap door still stands a 'hamster wheel' large enough for two men, used to raise bricks, stone, and tools to the ceiling level of the tower, together with its winding gear - these were used up until the 1970s when they failed to pass modern Health and Safety tests; their last official use was to raise TV cameras used for the Enthronement of Donald Coggan in 1974.





(Thanks to www.canterbury-archaeology.org.uk/ for this information)

Pay by PayPal

£425
 
Item added to cart
Canterbury Cathedral Ceiling

Canterbury Cathedral Ceiling
Pen and Watercolour on Paper
Framed: 53 x 53cm

Frame
Matt black contemporary wooden frame with acrylic glazing.
Acid-free warm white double mount and backing board


The tower of Canterbury Cathedral is prominent for miles around the city, and stands 250 feet high to the top of its pinnacles. The fan vaulting seen from below is one of the most striking views in the cathedral - note the letters P (Prior), T (Thomas) and G (Goldstone) which surround the central blue shield with a white cross (arms of Christ Church Priory) this central shield and cross can be removed as a trap door - it is over 5 feet in diameter. Beside this trap door still stands a 'hamster wheel' large enough for two men, used to raise bricks, stone, and tools to the ceiling level of the tower, together with its winding gear - these were used up until the 1970s when they failed to pass modern Health and Safety tests; their last official use was to raise TV cameras used for the Enthronement of Donald Coggan in 1974.





(Thanks to www.canterbury-archaeology.org.uk/ for this information)

Pay by PayPal

£425
 
Item added to cart